Got pot holes?

The TAB interviewed Shane L. Mark, Newton’s Department of Public Works’ director of streets, to talk about pot holes. And here’s a video we’ve shared before on Village 14 that explains just how pot holes are formed....
Laredo on traffic and parking

Laredo on traffic and parking

City Council President Marc Laredo shared some thoughts about traffic and parking in an email to campaign supporters (and also let them know that he will be seeking reelection).  Here’s the portion of his email about traffic and parking.

Dear Friends:

I hope that you and your families are doing well and looking forward to spring!
In this update, I will focus on two interrelated issues that are a source of continued frustration for Newton residents – traffic and parking.
 
As I travel through the city, whether walking, running, biking or driving, it is readily apparent that we have a lot of automobile traffic.  At times, it is difficult to walk or bike safely, and parking can be limited.  So what should we do?
 
We need to promote safe walking and bicycling and the use of mass transit. Yet, at the same time, we should acknowledge that

And this wasn’t even a big storm

Cyclist Brendan Keegan posted this video shortly after our last snow storm..

Northland to present plan to finance four shuttle bus routes

Northland to present plan to finance four shuttle bus routes

The City Council’s Land Use Committee will meet on Tuesday, Jan. 15 at 7 p.m. at Newton City Hall to hear about Northland’s much-anticipated transportation plan for its project at Needham and Oak Streets. 

Northland is proposing a variety of traffic mitigation remedies, including limiting residential parking to one space per unit and funding new and improved bike and pedestian paths.

But the most significant part of the plan is a proposal to operate and fund a shuttle system that would be open to public use at

Close Shave: Where can we shave streets for parks and pedestrians?

When looking through the collaborative zoning map recently I was struck by a comment in my neighborhood. Someone had suggested turning a stretch of Albermarle Rd., which has no driveways, into parkland. It made complete sense since the one-block road is unnecessary. In fact, a few years ago the city made the left-hand turn there illegal because people were using it as a way to avoid a traffic light.

This also came to mind when I watched the video about Washington Street and saw how changes in the street can take are

‘The notion that Washington St. should be narrowed from 2 lanes in each direction down to one lane is ludicrous.’

That quote in the headline comes from this comment on a prior thread. But the “notion” that narrowing a street can improve traffic flow was also a hot topic last night at the very well-attended opening Washington Street Corridor vision event at the Second Church.

This “notion” comes from the video (below) made by by Jeff Speck, a renowned expert on this topic (with transit experts Nelson/Nygaard) who has documented where similar techniques have been successfully employed to improve traffic elsewhere.

I understand why this idea of putting a road on “a diet” sounds “ludicrous.” But before you rush to dismiss it, please take the time to watch this video. And then share your thoughts.

The Washington Street Corridor Proposal from Elkus Manfredi on Vimeo.

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