Hobson: Fuller should be Riverside’s ‘loudest cheerleader’

Hobson: Fuller should be Riverside’s ‘loudest cheerleader’

The following originally appeared as a letter to the editor in this week’s Newton TAB. Reprinted with permission.

In a recent newsletter, Mayor Fuller informs us that the plan for Riverside has been scaled back in response to “neighbors’ concerns,” which “also means a reduction in community benefits.” She suggests attending the next City Council hearing, if we “want to be involved.” I can almost hear, “Or whatever.”

The lack of enthusiasm in the Mayor’s message is unsettling. A year ago, she signed the Metro Mayors Coalition Housing Task Force Compact with 14 other area leaders (housingtaskforce.mapc.org), affirming the dire regional housing shortage and pledging to do all she could to alleviate it.

At the time, she told the Boston Globe that housing proposals in Newton faced tough neighborhood opposition, but she had faith in the

Fuller acknowledges Newton’s ‘poor grades on a housing report card’

This just in from Newton Mayor Ruthanne Fuller’s weekly email newsletter …

The Boston Foundation recently released its Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2019 looking at housing affordability and housing production in the 147 cities and towns in the five counties surrounding Boston.

We’re expensive. More specifically, the Report found that metro-Boston, which includes Newton, is one of the nation’s most expensive places to buy (4th in the U.S.) or rent (3rd in the U.S.). The authors highlighted that the limited supply of housing stock and high cost contributes to persistent racial segregation.

The Report evaluated each city and town. Newton had low scores except for

Globe: 15 communities help address housing crisis (spoiler: Newton not on list)

From Sunday’s Boston Globe

A recent report highlighting the need for more local housing production found that from 2013 to 2017, 15 municipalities issued more than half the building permits in the state. Boston led the way, followed by Cambridge, Plymouth, Watertown, Everett, Weymouth, Somerville, Burlington, Chelsea, Framingham, Hopkinton, Middleborough, Quincy, Arlington, and Canton.

and here’s a key quote:

The recent report “demonstrates the power that local communities have to

The reality of seniors and housing

The recent statement from this presentation from Right Sized Newton (page 12) that “… seniors overwhelmingly DO NOT WANT to live in luxury high-rise rental apartments” is simply not true. I say this based on academic background; extended membership/ leadership of the...

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