Fuller acknowledges Newton’s ‘poor grades on a housing report card’

This just in from Newton Mayor Ruthanne Fuller’s weekly email newsletter …

The Boston Foundation recently released its Greater Boston Housing Report Card 2019 looking at housing affordability and housing production in the 147 cities and towns in the five counties surrounding Boston.

We’re expensive. More specifically, the Report found that metro-Boston, which includes Newton, is one of the nation’s most expensive places to buy (4th in the U.S.) or rent (3rd in the U.S.). The authors highlighted that the limited supply of housing stock and high cost contributes to persistent racial segregation.

The Report evaluated each city and town. Newton had low scores except for

Globe: 15 communities help address housing crisis (spoiler: Newton not on list)

From Sunday’s Boston Globe

A recent report highlighting the need for more local housing production found that from 2013 to 2017, 15 municipalities issued more than half the building permits in the state. Boston led the way, followed by Cambridge, Plymouth, Watertown, Everett, Weymouth, Somerville, Burlington, Chelsea, Framingham, Hopkinton, Middleborough, Quincy, Arlington, and Canton.

and here’s a key quote:

The recent report “demonstrates the power that local communities have to

Report: Newton ranks low in housing affordability, diversity, production

Scott Souza at Patch summarizes the findings of Boston Foundation’s Greater Boston Housing Report Card related to Newton..

Newton ranks below the eastern Massachusetts average in housing production, diversity of housing and affordability, according to The Boston Foundation’s Greater Boston Housing Report Card released on Wednesday. The report graded 147 cities and towns based on

WGBH explores Newton’s density debate

From WGHB reporter Craig LeMoult
At a public hearing in Newton last week on a proposal for a huge new housing and commercial development, some community members who spoke said they see density as a solution to the city’s housing problems. Dense housing, these residents said, creates a more vibrant community atmosphere, enables more use of mass transit, and helps reduce the city’s impact on climate change. But for others, even those who want to see more

Do you agree that Metropolitan Boston has a housing crisis? Yes or no?

Just about everyone agrees Metropolitan Boston has a housing crisis.

That’s the opening line in a new study the Globe described as the first comprehensive review of zoning laws in Eastern Massachusetts in more than a decade.

Then the report’s continues….

We just surpassed New York City to become the third most expensive large metro rental market in the country. Single-family and condo prices have continued to climb, with median sale prices of nearly $430,000 across the entire metro area, a 4 percent increase since the end of 2017. Renters are being hit with rent increases and evictions, causing housing instability, displacement, and homelessness. In fact, throughout Massachusetts, one out of every four renters – and even one out of every ten

RightSize called out for politicizing Porch Fest

RightSize called out for politicizing Porch Fest

Organizers of Saturday’s Porch Fest and at least some of their hosts are peeved that the anti-development group RightSize Riverside have been trying to politicize the event. Here’s an email organizers sent today.

Dear PorchFest hosts:

You may have received “RightSize Riverside” flyers this afternoon with a note encouraging you to distribute them at PorchFest.  
 
We did not provide your contact information to the RightSize Riverside organization!  It appears as if the Right Size Riverside obtained the addresses of all PorchFest hosts from the published map and brochure and elected to drop off flyers without our approval.
 
We feel very strongly that PorchFest is all about music and community.  We received several

Do attendees at public meetings reflect the views of the general public?

From a story on the CityLab website….

To understand local housing politics over the past several decades, consider a recent study out of Boston University. Political science professor Katherine Levine Einstein surveyed all of the minutes for zoning and planning meetings about housing across 97 cities and counties in Massachusetts…

 

“In every single city and county we studied, the advantaged dominated the proceedings,” Einstein said at a recent Brookings Institution panel on housing. Residents who are older, men, longtime residents, local voters, and homeowners are much more likely to participate in these meetings. And they are much more likely to oppose new construction than the general public.

 

Residents who oppose new housing are also

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